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A Ferrari for the family leads Bonhams Simeone auction

Published in blog.hemmings.com

1970 Ferrari 365 GT 2+2. Photos courtesy Bonhams Auctions.

Of all the reasons to buy a Ferrari, “room enough for the entire family” rarely makes the list, yet that’s exactly what prompted the purchase of this 1970 Ferrari 365 GT 2+2 a decade-and-a-half back. On Monday, October 8, the sub-16,000-mile fastback sold for a fee-inclusive $215,040, becoming the top lot in Bonhams’ Philadelphia Simeone Foundation Automotive Museum sale.

1970 Ferrari 365 GT

Ferrari has long been associated with two-seat sports cars, but the Italian automaker’s 2+2 coupes have perpetually been bestsellers. Beginning with the 250 GTE 2+2, which launched in 1960, the 330 GT 2+2 and its successor, the 365 GT 2+2, all represented roughly 50 percent of Maranello’s production output, despite the plethora of sports and racing cars in the company’s portfolio.

1970 Ferrari 365 GT

The 365 GT 2+2, which debuted at the 1967 Paris Auto Salon, took the company in a slightly different direction than earlier four-seat models. The body, styled by Aldo Brovarone at Pininfarina, resembled the firm’s work on the top-of-the-line Ferrari 500 Superfast, and the two cars even shared a 104.3-inch wheelbase, but the 365 GT 2+2 grew 6.3 inches in length, reaching 196 inches (16 feet, 4 inches) from front to back. The 365 GT 2+2 was heavier than the earlier Superfast, too, gaining 176 pounds to reach a curb weight of 3,256 pounds.

1970 Ferrari 365 GT

Compared to its most direct predecessor, the 330 GT 2+2, the new 365 GT 2+2 was 5.5-inches longer, 2.75-inches wider, and – most significantly – 220 pounds heavier. It was more powerful, too, thanks to a 4.4-liter V-12 that replaced the earlier model’s 4.0-liter V-12, boosting output from 300-320 hp. A five-speed manual transmission was standard, and despite its mass, the 365 GT 2+2 could reportedly run from 0-60 mph in under seven seconds, topping out at just below 150 mph.

1970 Ferrari 365 GT

While the 330 GT 2+2 used a live rear axle, the 365 GT 2+2 was the first four-seater from Maranello to receive a fully independent suspension in all four corners. Rear shocks, designed by Koni, were self-leveling, and vented power-assisted disc brakes on all four wheels ensured the big Grand Tourer stopped with the same enthusiasm in which it generated speed.

1970 Ferrari 365 GT

Cars exported to the U.S. came equipped with luxury amenities like air conditioning and power steering, and Connolly leather was used to upholster the seats and door panels. British enthusiast magazine Car described the 365 GT 2+2 as “the most civilized Ferrari yet,” and buyers agreed, snapping up just more than 800 examples over five years of production, from 1967-’71.

1970 Ferrari 365 GT

The example sold in Philadelphia was purchased by the consignor to take his family to car shows, and was reportedly purchased from the Blackhawk Collection. Acquired in the early 2000s with roughly 14,000 miles on the odometer, the Ferrari has been driven sparingly over the last 15 years, and was photographed for the auction with 15,662 miles displayed. Said to have received a recent major service, a new exhaust, new shocks and other suspension work, fresh fluids, and a tune-up, the selling price was considerably less than Hagerty’s published value of $246,000 for a condition #3 car.

1933 Packard Super Eight

1933 Packard Super Eight Model 1004 touring car.

Other lots in the sale’s top-10 included a 1936 Bentley 4¼ Liter Airflow saloon, which sold for $190,400; a 2001 BMW Z8 roadster, which sold for $162,400; a 1954 Kaiser Darrin 161, which sold for $135,520; a 2002 Bentley Continental R Mulliner, which sold for $128,800; a 1916 Simplex Crane Model 5 46-hp limousine, which sold for $123,200; a 1923 Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost roadster with replica “Piccadilly” coachwork, which sold for $117,600; a 1957 Cadillac Eldorado Biarritz convertible, which sold for $109,200; a 1933 Packard Super Eight Model 1004 touring car, which sold for $106,400; and a 1947 Jaguar Mk IV 3½ Liter drophead coupe, which sold for $100,800.

1975 Lincoln Continental Mk IV

1975 Lincoln Continental Mk IV.

More affordable lots of interest included a three-owner 1975 Lincoln Continental Mark IV coupe, with less than 9,800 miles, which sold for $5,600; a circa-1920s Auto Red Bug electric buckboard, used by J.P. Morgan and family for turkey hunting at their Jekyll Island, Georgia, estate, which sold for $6,000; an unrestored 1940 Lincoln Continental convertible, fitted with period speed equipment, which sold for $6,720; and a 1913 Ford Model T touring car, described as a highly original survivor in running condition, which sold for $9,856.

For completed results from the Philadelphia Simeone Foundation Automotive Museum sale, visit Bonhams.com.